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CCMA Accredits Bargaining and Statutory Councils

June 29, 2021

Department of Employment and Labour

Bargaining and statutory councils accredited to conduct conciliation and arbitration have been listed.

The employment and labour department published the list in Government Gazette 44761 in terms of the Labour Relations Act.

The councils have been accredited by the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA).

The National Bargaining Council of the Leather Industry of South Africa is accredited for conciliations only from 1 July 2021 until 30 June 2022 while the South African Road Passenger Bargaining Council is accredited for conciliations and arbitrations (including Inquiry by Arbitrator) from 1 June 2021 until 31 May 2024.

The Statutory Council for the Squid and Related Fisheries of South Africa is accredited for conciliations and arbitrations (including Inquiry by Arbitrator) from 1 June 2021 until 31 May 2024.

In Notice 384, the department announced that the Fairness Institute (Pty) Ltd is accredited for conciliations and arbitrations (including Inquiry by Arbitrator) from 1 May 2021 until 30 June 2024 on condition that all CCMA efficiencies are adhered to.

Meanwhile, in a statement, the employment and labour minister, Thulas Nxesi, has called on parliament to speed up the processing of the Employment Equity Act amendments as contained in the Employment Equity Amendment Bill currently before the portfolio committee on employment and labour.

The bill was tabled in parliament in July 2020.

The bill aims to amend the Employment Equity Act, 1998, so as to:


• amend a definition;
• insert certain definitions, to substitute a definition and to delete a definition;
• provide for the Minister to identify sectoral numerical targets in order to ensure the equitable representation of suitably qualified people from designated groups; and
• provide for matters connected therewith.

The proposed legislation will empower the labour minister to determine sectoral numerical targets in order to ensure the equitable representation of suitably qualified people from designated groups (blacks, women and persons with disabilities) at all occupational levels in the workforce.

It also seeks to enhance the administration of the act including the implementation of section 53 that provides for the issuing of a certificate by the minister confirming an employer’s compliance with Chapter II, or Chapters II and III, of the act, as the case may be, in relation to the conclusion of State Contracts.

The bill also aims to remove the requirement for psychological testing and similar assessments of employees to be certified by the Health Professions Council of South Africa and to remove a provision empowering non-designated employers to notify the Director-General of the labour department that they intend to voluntarily comply with Chapter III of the act as if they were a designated employer.

The minister, speaking at the launch of the Commission for Employment Equity Report, described the bill as a “catalyst to expedite transformation in the workplace”.

The minister also pointed out that employment equity legislation has so far failed to achieve its intended purpose and objective.